Modules Offered 2016-11-17T10:27:38+00:00

Below is a list of the different modules offered for the Common Awards at Levels 4, 5 and 6. Please note that not all modules are offered each year.

This module will offer students an initial overview of the New Testament, of the various genres of literature that are found in it and of the major theological themes its writings raise. It will present the contexts and concerns out of which the New Testament books emerged, set them within their broader historical, religious and cultural backgrounds, and examine the ways that the ancient authors expressed both particular pastoral concerns and more general theological convictions. Further, the module will explore some of the ways in which the New Testament has been handled and used in various eras and contexts, and will allow careful consideration of what might constitute appropriate interpretation and use of these books in today’s church and world. Students will be encouraged to read the whole New Testament in the course of their work on the module.
This module provides an initial overview of the Old Testament. The teaching is oriented around some of the key genres, since understanding the kinds of literature in the Old Testament provides important guidance about how to interpret texts appropriately in their historical, literary and cultural context. Some of the tools, methods and approaches used in modern biblical scholarship are also introduced, paying attention to their limitations as well as their strengths. Particular attention is paid to the tension between historical critical and literary approaches to the text.

In addition students will be given an overview of the developing plot of the Old Testament as it traces the journey of the people of God through the Pentateuch, the historical books, the prophets, and on towards the New Testament. Guidance is given about how to acknowledge the contingent and temporary character of much of the Old Testament, while affirming how it remains a vital theological and historical foundation for later Christian life and thought.

The aim of this module is to enable students to develop a deeper understanding of New Testament Greek. It consolidates everything covered in module TMM1067 and further develops students’ understanding of Greek grammar and syntax. It is based on reading and translating the set text (four chapters from the Gospel of John, plus material from lessons 26ff in the course text book.

Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which the Biblical text may be translated into English. This module will thus equip students with the confidence to use significant reference resources that refer to the Greek (lexicons, concordances, dictionaries, commentaries, etc.). It will enable them to engage with the Greek texts in Level 5 and 6 exegesis work if they choose these options. It will inculcate the ability to evaluate different English translations of New Testament material, especially those widely used in church life.

The aim of this module is to enable students to develop a deeper understanding of Biblical Hebrew, developing students’ understanding of Hebrew grammar and syntax. It is based on reading and translating the set text, five chapters of narrative prose from the Hebrew Bible; and further chapters of the course text book.

Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which the Biblical text may be translated into English. The module will thus equip students with the confidence to use significant reference resources that refer to the Hebrew (lexicons, concordances, dictionaries, commentaries, etc.). It will enable them to engage with the Hebrew texts in Level 5 and 6 exegesis work if they choose these options. It will inculcate the ability to evaluate different English translations of Old Testament material, especially those widely used in church life.

This module builds foundations for ongoing study in Christian Doctrine by examining the ways in which Christians have known and described God as Creator, as the Son who came to save and as the Spirit who is the Life-giver. The module will also explore the sources which have been used to describe that knowledge, namely scripture, tradition, reason and experience. These foundations will be rooted in the life of the Church both in the sense of locating where that belief emerges from but also how it is held through the creeds and how it helps to re-shape the church today. The module will be based in a faith which seeks understanding so that a passion can be instilled which enables a student to make connections between faith and life. More than this, it is hoped that by exploring the voices which have gone before, students can both make sense of the framework in which belief is set but can also find their own voices.
This module builds foundations for ongoing study in Christian Doctrine by examining the ways in which Christians have known and described God as Creator, as the Son who came to save and as the Spirit who is the Life-giver. The module will also explore the sources which have been used to describe that knowledge, namely scripture, tradition, reason and experience. These foundations will be rooted in the life of the Church both in the sense of locating where that belief emerges from but also how it is held through the creeds and how it helps to re-shape the church today. The module will be based in a faith which seeks understanding so that a passion can be instilled which enables a student to make connections between faith and life. More than this, it is hoped that by exploring the voices which have gone before, students can both make sense of the framework in which belief is set but can also find their own voices.
This module introduces students to the study of the Church in historical context. Students will be familiarised with the practices, methods, and modes of Church history through the examination of specified historical period or periods. The module will help students grasp the historical experience of the Church as a foundation for further study in Church history, doctrine, liturgy, and pastoral practice. As appropriate to the specified time-frame, particular attention will be paid to the historical context of the formation of Christian doctrine, the nature of the Church’s self-understanding and self-expression, her relations with, and her interaction with other religious and philosophical traditions. Due attention must also be paid to the variety of Christian experience in the specified periods.
This module integrates the theory and practice of Christian ethics. It begins by looking at questions of methodology in Christian ethics, commending an approach to Christian ethics which engages with key sources: the Bible, Christian tradition, reason and experience. It considers different approaches which variously emphasise rules, consequences and virtues, before looking more closely at the key virtues of love and justice. Linked with this discussion is a survey of important issues in the contemporary world, exploring topics in political, ecological and sexual ethics. Both academic understanding of Christian ethics and the practical living of Christian faith are emphasised.
This module will offer students an overview of learning theories, approaches and methodologies; learning styles and preferences. Students will explore learning theorists, the learning cycle and learning process in relation to young people, children and their own learning preferences. The module will also address issues relating to the facilitation of learning groups in a range of contexts, and address issues around additional needs and challenging behaviour. Students will also have the opportunity to explore learning through the lens of a key theological theme, for example: Pneumatology, Christology and wisdom.
This module introduces students, at the start of their studies, to the discipline of theology when studied in the context of a vocation to Christian ministry and mission. The former Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams suggested that “…in the most basic sense of all, God’s call is the call to be: the vocation of creatures is to exist. And, secondly, the vocation of creatures is to exist as themselves, to be bearers of their names, answering to the word which gives each its distinctive identity.” (Williams, R. Open to judgement: Sermons and addresses (London: Darton, Longman and Todd 1994) p.173. This module attempts to help students find their own identity as disciples, within the formative learning community that they are now joining and its many spheres: academic, worship, community life, personal formation and spirituality. It is to be hoped that growth in these will be holistic and an attempt is made to unite them under the concept of growing into one’s identity as a reflective practitioner of the Christian faith. Central, therefore to the module is theological reflection.
This module aims to introduce students to Islam as a world faith and to Muslims as a community of faith so that we can learn what it is to be neighbours and to engage with those who are different from us. Such awareness will be grown by an element of personal encounter with Muslims so that we can get under the skin of what it is to be a Muslim. We shall also want to dig deeper to engage with some of the issues which underpin Islam and how that is reflected in Multi-faith Britain. A visit to engage with such a community will lie at the heart of the module. Alongside this, the varying responses of Christians on a personal, theological and relational level will also be studied so as to give students an opportunity to reflect on good practice for their ongoing and future ministry in such communities. At the heart of this will be the theological embrace of difference, its dignity and the hospitality which might mark out Christian responses to those whom we encounter. There will be significant time given in the module to examining our own worldviews and attitudes so that we might reflect critically on those. It is hoped that students will become so formed in understanding issues of faith, culture and identity in a multi-cultural society that they move towards becoming instinctive in their desire to dialogue with, and to work with, those of other world-faith communities.
Integrated study modules offer students the opportunity to explore a specific topic from the perspective of various theological and other disciplines in a context of group learning. The primary focus is to help students develop cross-disciplinary skills in study and reflection while working as a team towards a group assessment, developing skills of reflection and self-awareness as a member of a group in a prospective pastoral or ecclesial situation.

The choice of the specific topic lies with the training institution. It might be a major issue in society, Christian life, discipleship, mission or ministry, or a particular theological theme. The topic will then be studied from at least three of the following theological perspectives: biblical studies, mission studies, pastoral theology, church history, ethics, systematics, liturgical studies, or ecclesiology. There will also be insights from at least one ‘non-theological’ discipline, such as psychology, philosophy, sociology, cultural studies, media studies.

Examples of possible topics include:

  • Sexuality
  • Diversity, Inclusion and Privilege
  • Christianity and Islam
  • Bereavement
  • Environment and Creation Care

Students will be required to attend the appropriate classes, to follow them up with additional recommended reading, to keep a reflective learning journal throughout the delivery of the module, and to participate in group discussions and group work leading to the group project. Students should be particularly aware that the challenge and the benefit of this module is the opportunity to work with others from different backgrounds.

This module is designed to enable participants to engage in independent learning related to a chosen subject area in the context of discipleship, mission and ministry. In consultation and negotiation with the tutor, participants will identify a topic, issue, or ministerial area relevant to the study of the theory and practice of ministry and in which there is academic expertise in the Cambridge Theological Federation. An independent learning project will be developed which may include both library and practical research. The area chosen may enhance and integrate study from the taught module programme providing the independent study is clearly distinguished from the content of such taught modules.
This module is designed to enable participants to engage in independent learning related to a chosen subject area in the context of discipleship, mission and ministry. In consultation and negotiation with the tutor, participants will identify a topic, issue, or ministerial area relevant to the study of the theory and practice of ministry and in which there is academic expertise in the Cambridge Theological Federation. An independent learning project will be developed which may include both library and practical research. The area chosen may enhance and integrate study from the taught module programme providing the independent study is clearly distinguished from the content of such taught modules.
This module is made up of separate strands consisting of missional mapping, leadership, denominational identity and worship. Each of these strands involves the exploration of biblical and theological principles alongside practical application.

Students will bring existing congregational experience alongside engagement with new church settings, and may be engaged in a local church or college chapel attachment which will involve ministry in public worship along with pastoral work. During the course of the academic year there may also be the opportunity to engage in some form of missional activity, in the local church/attachment context and/or elsewhere. These practical elements, together with prior experience, will form the raw material for reflection.

This module will focus on the life and ministry of a given ecclesial setting and the formational and vocational development of the student. The research into the profile of the ecclesial context will focus on life within the congregation. Students will be expected to observe how the congregation is equipped for mission. The missional element of this module will include learning about evangelism and apologetics, with a focus on learning skills of communicating missionally on a one-to-one basis.

Foundations for Ministry and Mission in Context is designed to be followed by Development of Ministry and Mission in Context in the following academic year. The Level 5 module will focus on the life of a given ecclesial context beyond the congregation and how the church/chapel engages with its wider community in mission. This Level 4 module will focus on the internal life of the local/attachment church/chapel and the formational and vocational development of the student.

This module will introduce students to the study of Christian worship, their denominational and ecclesial tradition and preaching. These three areas will be studied in relation to a particular placement context, students’ own experience and students’ exercise of Christian ministry. In all three areas, the module provides an introduction which forms the basis for further study later. The module will introduce students to current scholarly thinking in the three areas and to historic debates around selected issues. The module therefore seeks to embody a dialogue between theory and practice which is expressed in theological reflection.
This module will offer students introductory material exploring some of the major themes and issues relating to pastoral care in congregational contexts. The place of pastoral care in the life and worship of Christian communities will be examined and assessed. Students will be encouraged to begin to develop the skills and dispositions required to offer sustained and appropriate pastoral care in ways that do justice to context and to their own roles and experience. These explorations will pay attention to scriptural models and a range of Christian traditions. They will also be informed by relevant material drawn from the social sciences and psychology where these offer insights into human development and life processes both for individuals and for groups. The module will offer students opportunities to practice and enhance skills that are essential within the pastoral ministries of the Church. This will include careful attention when listening, and an appreciation of the significance of loss and grief as a worked example of pastoral care. It will also enable students to begin to engage with best practice in safeguarding, child protection and the protection of vulnerable adults. As an introductory course this module will, inevitably, connect with some material in more superficial ways than at depth. It will provide starting points for further study, engagement and formation and a range of resources with which to continue to grow into the ministries of pastoral care.
This module seeks to explore and discuss some of the key themes in pastoral care and ministry. Through analysis of the assumptions and different perspectives that can be associated with pastoral themes and issues, students will engage with pastoral care in both congregational and wider contexts. There will be an emphasis on examining personal experience of pastoral care and how this influences personal response and pastoral practice.

The module will seek to develop and resource skills for pastoral ministry and enable students to use a variety of sources to understand the context and issues and to form an appropriate pastoral response. Throughout the module, students will consider how pastoral care can be prophetic and theological in its expression.

This module is intended to enable students to encounter and to work effectively within a given placement context. Some placements will involve an ecclesial context, others will involve a particular social context. The context engagement will vary according to the particular placement undertaken. The placement will involve a minimum of 35 hours contact time in the location concerned. It will also provide skills in analysis and in integrating theological enquiry with practice, enabling a deeper understanding of the setting and of the specific sociological, theological and missiological issues relevant to it. As part of initial orientation and further reflection, students will be required to keep a diary of their activities, and to take part in regular discussions with a supervisor familiar with the setting.
Students enrolled on this module will be placed with other students in a context – normally for the duration of their study programme. The context is likely to be a parish, congregation, mission or pioneer project with a qualified professional who can act as supervisor to the group. Because of the holistic nature of the placement, students will be engaging with and learning about a number of areas of Christian discipleship, mission and ministry. The module comprises:

  • Regular guided practical experience of mission and ministry, normally with a team of other students, in the parish / congregation / pioneer initiative / mission project and the wider community throughout the year of study. This enables students to work effectively and collaboratively within a sustained setting that offers both ecclesial and non-ecclesial ministerial and mission experience.
  • An introduction to theological reflection methodologies and to methods for analysing and reading a context. Both personal and collaborative theological reflection is practiced.
  • Contextual engagement with key themes of relevant disciplines, with a particular focus on opportunities to develop understanding and practice of spirituality and worship.
  • Supervision by on-site staff (usually the church / project leader) and a tutor in the students’ own training institution.
This module will offer an overview of the broader context of children and family work, e.g. UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989), Playwork charter etc., and introduce students to professional standards, principles and values in children and family work (including grace principles), legal and policy frameworks such as: safeguarding, duty of care, health and safety, risk assessment. This module will offer the opportunity to reflect on issues related to management of self in a professional context and theological reflection on contemporary practices and principles of children’s work.
This module will offer an overview of the broader context of youth work, e.g. UN convention on the rights of the Child, Positive for Youth etc., and introduce students to professional standards, principles and values, legal and policy frameworks such as: safeguarding, duty of care, health and safety, risk assessment. This module will offer the opportunity to reflect on issues related to management of self in a professional context and theological reflection on contemporary practices and principles of youth work.
The aim of this module is to enable students to gain a foundational understanding of the professional disciplines of work with children and families and playwork and the relationship between them.

  • To contextualise National Occupational Standards into the ministry setting.
  • To develop professional skills in work with children and families and apply these in practice.
  • To develop as self-aware, collaborative, theologically-reflective practitioners.

By the end of this module students will be expected to demonstrate an ability to apply their developing knowledge of working within a team/organisation, building purposeful relationships and facilitating learning in a range of ministerial contexts. This will include non-routine tasks and some individual responsibility and autonomy. They will assist with a range of duties including collaborative tasks, development of volunteers, project development and sharing information with other agencies. They will demonstrate a commitment to professional principles and values.

The aim of this module is to enable students to gain a foundational understanding of the professional disciplines of work with young people in a ministerial context.

  • To contextualise National Occupational Standards into the ministry setting.
  • To develop ministerial skills in work with young people and apply these in practice.
  • To develop as self-aware, collaborative, theologically-reflective practitioners.

By the end of this module students will be expected to demonstrate an ability to apply their developing knowledge of working within a team/organisation, building purposeful relationships and facilitating learning in a range of ministerial contexts. This will include non-routine tasks and some individual responsibility and autonomy. They will assist with a range of duties including collaborative tasks, development of volunteers, project development and sharing information with other agencies. They will demonstrate a commitment to professional principles and values.

This module will offer students an overview of practices of private and corporate prayer in relation to their historical, ecclesial and contemporary contexts. Students will be introduced to relevant scriptural and doctrinal sources and encouraged to develop self-understanding and spiritual discernment and practice, through, for example, the formation or development of a ‘rule of life’, the keeping of a prayer diary, and the writing of a reflection on these areas.
This module offers an introduction to Christian worship for the purposes of preparation for public ministry. Its perspectives are ecumenical, historical, theological and phenomenological, and it aims to help students to root their own experience and tradition within the wider contexts of the Christian faith, as well as to grow in confidence in their ability to interpret and apply their learning to their specific ministerial setting.

The historical material will provide a general overview of the origins and development of forms of Christian worship. The phenomenological study will have as its primary focus the two dominical sacraments of baptism and eucharist, as well as the proclamation of the word. The emphasis will be on the Western liturgical tradition, though reference will be made where appropriate to Eastern practice.

The practical aspects of the module will include discussion of contemporary contextual challenges, and the need to negotiate faithfulness to the inherited tradition in situations of change and complexity. Tradition-specific practice will be covered elsewhere in tradition-specific contexts, though many of the tools that enable us to work within such contexts will be introduced in the module.

The aim of this module is to help students better understand the Bible within its original context (as that can best be reconstructed), and as it has been interpreted in many different contexts during history in order that students can develop good practice in using the Bible within their own contexts today.

Using the Matthean parables and the Psalms as base texts, the module will survey different approaches to these texts and ways people have explored the world behind the text, in the text and in front of the text and applied the text to their own context. We will explore what makes for better or worse applications in a particular context and attempt to critically assess one’s own and others interpretations.

The aim of this module is to understand, and begin to make use of, the insights that a close critical reading can give through intensive study of a selected text from the New Testament. In the process, you will become more aware of the range of interpretative approaches available, and the different ways in which the text can be interpreted responsibly in a variety of different contexts.

Using the tools of modern scholarship while paying attention to the text’s history of interpretation, and its relevance to contemporary Christian theology, preaching and praxis, the module will include intensive study of a particular text from the New Testament. The format of the module will include a combination of lectures, small group learning and private study of the selected text. This will encourage self-directed learning and reflection. The main focus will be on the central theological themes of the writings, examined through detailed study of selected portions of the texts.

The aim of this module is to understand, and begin to make use of, the insights that close critical reading can give into the interpretation of a particular text from the Old Testament. In the process, students will become more aware of their own interpretive methods. This will inculcate critical skills that can be applied to other texts throughout ministry and encourage life-long learning.

This module enables students to use the tools of modern scholarship, while paying attention to a text’s history of interpretation, and its relevance to contemporary ecclesial communities. The format of the module will include a combination of lectures, small-group learning and private study, which will encourage self-directed learning and reflection.

This module will explore several major areas of doctrine with a particular emphasis on their roots in Scripture and their expression in the work of significant recent and contemporary theologians from different Christian traditions. Topics of discussion include approaches to systematic theology, Trinitarian theology, Christology, soteriology, sacramental theology, and ecclesiology. Doctrines will be examined and interpreted with reference to their biblical foundations, selected primary theological texts (in translation where not originally in English) and, where relevant, other sources (e.g. art, liturgy, hymnody or material evidence) which have influenced their shape and reception. Consideration will be given to each doctrine’s connection to the wider pattern of Christian theology. Attention will be paid to the relationships between doctrine and contemporary Christian practice and experience.
This module integrates the theory and practice of Christian ethics. It begins by looking at questions of methodology in Christian ethics, commending an approach to Christian ethics which engages with key sources: the Bible, Christian tradition, reason and experience. It considers different approaches which variously emphasise rules, consequences and virtues, before looking more closely at the key virtues of love and justice. Linked with this discussion is a survey of important issues in the contemporary world, exploring topics in political, ecological, economic, medical and sexual ethics. Both academic understanding of Christian ethics and the practical living of Christian faith are emphasised.
This module will introduce students to biblical and theological understandings of leadership, authority, service and collaboration within the perspective of the church’s ministry and mission. Students will engage in a study of the relationship between spirituality and servant leadership. Students will consider leadership from the perspective of listening to self, others, God and the world.
This module aims to introduce students to Islam as a world faith and to Muslims as a community of faith so that we can learn what it is to be neighbours and to engage with those who are different from us. Such awareness will be grown by an element of personal encounter with Muslims so that we can get under the skin of what it is to be a Muslim. We shall also want to dig deeper to engage with some of the issues which underpin Islam and how that is reflected in Multi-faith Britain. A visit to engage with such a community will lie at the heart of the module. Alongside this, the varying responses of Christians on a personal, theological and relational level will also be studied so as to give students an opportunity to reflect on good practice for their ongoing and future ministry in such communities. At the heart of this will be the theological embrace of difference, its dignity and the hospitality which might mark out Christian responses to those whom we encounter. There will be significant time given in the module to examining our own worldviews and attitudes so that we might reflect critically on those. It is hoped that students will become so formed in understanding issues of faith, culture and identity in a multi-cultural society that they move towards becoming instinctive in their desire to dialogue with, and to work with, those of other world-faith communities.
Integrated study modules offer students the opportunity to explore a specific topic from the perspective of various theological and other disciplines in a context of group learning. The primary focus is to help students develop cross-disciplinary skills in study and reflection while working as a team towards a group assessment, developing skills of reflection and self-awareness as a member of a group in a prospective pastoral or ecclesial situation.

The choice of the specific topic lies with the training institution. It might be a major issue in society, Christian life, discipleship, mission or ministry, or a particular theological theme. The topic will then be studied from at least three of the following theological perspectives: biblical studies, mission studies, pastoral theology, church history, ethics, systematics, liturgical studies, or ecclesiology. There will also be insights from at least one ‘non-theological’ discipline, such as psychology, philosophy, sociology, cultural studies, or media studies.

Examples of possible topics include:

  • Sexuality
  • Diversity, Inclusion and Privilege
  • Christianity and Islam
  • Bereavement
  • Environment and Creation Care

Students will be required to attend the appropriate classes, to follow them up with additional recommended reading, to keep a reflective learning journal throughout the delivery of the module, and to participate in group discussions and group work leading to the group project. Students should be particularly aware that the challenge and the benefit of this module is the opportunity to work with others from different backgrounds.

This module is to enable participants to engage in independent learning related to a chosen subject area in the context of discipleship, mission and ministry. In consultation and negotiation with the tutor, participants will identify a topic, issue, or ministerial area relevant to the study of the theory and practice of ministry and in which there is academic expertise in the Cambridge Theological Federation. An independent learning project will be developed which may include both library and practical research. The area chosen may enhance and integrate study from the taught module programme providing the independent study is clearly distinguished from the content of such taught modules.
This module is to enable participants to engage in independent learning related to a chosen subject area in the context of discipleship, mission and ministry. In consultation and negotiation with the tutor, participants will identify a topic, issue, or ministerial area relevant to the study of the theory and practice of ministry and in which there is academic expertise in the Cambridge Theological Federation. An independent learning project will be developed which may include both library and practical research. The area chosen may enhance and integrate study from the taught module programme providing the independent study is clearly distinguished from the content of such taught modules.
This module is made up of separate strands of missional mapping, leadership, denominational identity and worship. Each of these strands involves the exploration of biblical and theological principles alongside practical application.

Students will bring existing congregational experience alongside engagement with new church settings, and may be engaged in a local church or college chapel attachment which will involve ministry in public worship along with pastoral work. During the course of the academic year there may also be the opportunity to engage in some form of missional activity, in the local church/attachment context and/or elsewhere. These practical elements, together with prior experience, will form the raw material for reflection.

This module will focus on the missional life and ministry of a given ecclesial setting. The research into the profile of the ecclesial setting will be informed by a missional mapping exercise. The learning about leadership will focus on how to manage issues of change and conflict generated through having a missional focus. The learning about denominational identity will focus on traditional and new ways of being church, e.g. Fresh Expressions. The learning about worship will focus on how to CREATE expressions of worship that are accessible to un-churched and de-churched people.

This module is designed to help students to engage missionally with our contemporary culture. There are three elements to the module that contribute to this aim. First, it explores the evolving relationship between Christianity and its social and cultural context in the West, paying particular attention to the major intellectual, social and religious trends that have helped to shape people’s thinking in the 21st century as well as had a significant impact on the church’s life and witness. Second, the module aims to equip students with relevant contemporary skills for missional engagement. Underlying these is the ability to read and analyse culture from a missional perspective, exploring the unexamined assumptions of people around us whom the church is trying to reach. It aims to identify the key components for a church’s missional engagement, and to discern the key missional questions facing congregations today. The final element in the module is the study of apologetics. It surveys major apologetic approaches and evaluates their cultural effectiveness. It also tries to foster theological and cultural discernment in thinking about apologetic strategies, as well as nurture relevant skills in practice. As part of the course, students will present an apologetic approach to a contemporary question.
This module seeks to explore and discuss some of the key models and understandings of pastoral care and ministry. Through analysis of the assumptions and different perspectives that can be associated with pastoral themes and issues, students will engage with pastoral care in both congregational and wider contexts. There will be an emphasis on examining personal experience of pastoral care and how this influences personal response and pastoral practice.

The module will seek to develop and resource skills for pastoral ministry and enable students to use a variety of sources to understand the context and issues and to form an appropriate pastoral response. Throughout the module, students will consider how pastoral care can be prophetic and theological in its expression.

This module will provide students with the opportunity to critically engage with theological and theoretical frameworks for management within a church context and offer transferable learning for management within other voluntary sector organisations. Students will develop their understanding of key management tasks within these contexts, including strategic, financial and human resource management, and discuss how these are situated within relevant legal and policy frameworks. Students will explore notions of collaborative ministry and facilitation with a particular emphasis on their own preferences, blind spots, strengths and weaknesses as ministers, managers and facilitators.
This module is intended to enable students to encounter and to work effectively within a given placement context. Some placements will involve an ecclesial context, others will involve a particular social context. The context engagement will vary according to the particular placement undertaken. The placement will involve a minimum of 35 hours time in the location concerned. It will provide skills in critical theological analysis of secular context, of integrating theological enquiry and practice, enabling a deeper understanding of the setting, of specific sociological and theological, and missiological issues relevant to it and a deeper engagement with structures for learning as a reflective practitioner. Students will be expected to keep a diary of their activities, to take part in regular discussions with a supervisor familiar with the setting and to take part in peer cohort reflection.

The Level 5 module assumes some previous relevant learning or skills. Whilst introductory courses in Scripture, Doctrine and Foundations for Reflective Practice (Short) (Level 4) would be useful they are not pre-requisites for taking this module.

This module equips students for fitness to practice in pastoral ministry under supervision within one specified ecclesial or non-ecclesial context. The module requires context engagement of between 60 and 80 hours and 20 hours creative engagement in regular reflective practice in which theological and non-theological disciplines will be used to analyse and improve practice. The course will allow students to explore further a variety of methods of theological reflection and to practice these using material from their placement contexts.

Students will be expected to agree a plan of activities with their placement supervisor, which takes into account specific learning outcomes agreed by their Director of Pastoral Studies/ Director of Practical Theology. Students will be expected to work with a journal of their experiences; research their context fully using available resources and apply methods of reading and/or profiling a context, provide verbatim and other accounts of pastoral encounters and ‘critical incidents’ for analysis in a group context and reflect with a placement supervisor on their own development. Group teaching on specific areas of contextual and pastoral ministry will be linked to independent reading and research as well as to the material students bring to the group for reflection.

Students enrolled on this module will be placed with other students in a context – normally for the duration of their study programme. The context is likely to be a parish, congregation, mission or pioneer project with a qualified professional who can act as supervisor to the group. Because of the holistic nature of the placement, students will be engaging with and learning about a number of areas of Christian discipleship, mission and ministry. The module comprises:

  • Regular guided practical experience of mission and ministry, normally with a team of other students, in the parish / congregation / pioneer initiative / mission project and the wider community throughout the year of study. This enables students to work effectively and collaboratively within a sustained setting that offers both ecclesial and non-ecclesial ministerial and mission experience.
  • An introduction to theological reflection methodologies and to methods for analysing and reading a context. Both personal and collaborative theological reflection is practiced.
  • Contextual engagement with key themes of relevant disciplines, with a particular focus on opportunities to develop understanding and practice of spirituality and worship.
  • Supervision by on-site staff (usually the church / project leader) and a tutor in the students’ own training institution.
This module aims to introduce students to some of the major figures and themes in Christian spirituality. The module intends to create awareness of the plurality of expression in Christian spirituality and to consider how contextual issues and expressions are held in positive tension with the common life of the Christian Church.

The module will consider the historic context of the different topics it addresses but will also attempt to consider the impact of contemporary issues on the way in which a particular tradition is interpreted today. The module will address the challenges and opportunities that a modern, secular context presents to the way Christians live out the faith today, the ways in which the relationship between the various Christian traditions to the wider society has evolved, and the ways in which a meaningful, reciprocal dialogue can exist between contemporary society and Christian spirituality.

Students will be encouraged to reflect on the ways in which their current and future ministry may be shaped by the encounter with these traditions. Equally, students will be encouraged to explore the ways in which an awareness and appropriation of past expressions in Christian spirituality can lead to new and fresh Christian experiences. In this context, students will be asked to consider issues of continuity, adaptation, and fresh expressions in Christian spirituality.

The aim of this module is to explore in depth the close critical reading and intensive study of a selected text from the New Testament. In the process, you will examine the range of interpretative approaches available, and the different ways in which these texts can be interpreted responsibly in a variety of different contexts.

Using the tools of modern scholarship while paying attention to the text’s history of interpretation, and their relevance to contemporary Christian theology, preaching and praxis, the module will include intensive study of one text from the New Testament. The main focus will be on the central theological themes of the writings, examined through detailed study of selected portions of the text.

The aim of this module is to explore in depth the close critical reading and intensive study of a particular text from the Old Testament. In the process, students will examine the range of interpretative approaches available, and the different ways in which these texts can be interpreted responsibly in a variety of different contexts. This will develop critical skills that can be applied to other texts throughout ministry and encourage life-long learning.

This module enables students to use the tools of modern scholarship, while paying attention to a text’s history of interpretation, and its relevance to contemporary ecclesial communities. The format of the module will include a combination of lectures, small-group learning and private study, which will encourage self-directed learning and reflection.

This module will offer opportunities to explore a broad historical narrative of the Reformation era, with particular emphasis on England, and to consider the work of major theologians, Catholic and Protestant, of the era in their historical context. Students will be asked to choose theological issues, research their historical context and investigate an aspect of theological response contemporary to the era.

Study will begin with an historical survey of the period and some of its central issues, accompanied by analysis of key theological texts.

During this initial stage students will be asked to identify a topic of particular interest to them and then to prepare their written assignment in two parts. Part I will require an investigation of context and construction of an introductory narrative. Part II will involve an analysis of texts. Examples might be topics such as Psalmody in Calvinist Geneva and Calvin’s Commentary on the Psalms; Bible Translations into English and Cranmer’s Liturgical use of the Bible; Pastoral Care of Recusant Catholics and The Spirituality of Ignatius of Loyola; Protestantism, Poverty and Theological Approaches to the Poor in Sermons and Homilies, Women’s Writings as Evidence of their Christian Experience during the Era, Religious Art and Lutheran OR Catholic Painting. The essay topic will need to be agreed with the module leader and students will need to propose appropriate bibliography. Students will be asked to prepare an abstract of their research for circulation and discussion with other members of the group.

This module integrates the theory and practice of Christian ethics. It begins by looking at questions of methodology in Christian ethics, commending an approach to Christian ethics which engages with key sources: the Bible, Christian tradition, reason and experience. It considers different approaches which variously emphasise rules, consequences and virtues, before looking more closely at the key virtues of love and justice. Linked with this discussion is a survey of important issues in the contemporary world, exploring topics in political, ecological, economic, medical and sexual ethics. Both academic understanding of Christian ethics and the practical living of Christian faith are emphasised.
Integrated study modules offer students the opportunity to explore and analyse a specific topic from the perspectives of various theological and other disciplines in a context of group learning. The primary focus is to help students further develop cross-disciplinary skills in study and reflection while working as a team towards a group assessment, honing skills of reflection and self-awareness as a member of a group in a prospective pastoral or ecclesial situation.

The choice of the specific topic lies with the training institution. It might be a major issue in society, Christian life, discipleship, mission or ministry, or a particular theological theme. The topic will then be studied from at least three of the following theological perspectives: biblical studies, mission studies, pastoral theology, church history, ethics, systematics, liturgical studies, or ecclesiology. There will also be insights from at least one ‘non-theological’ discipline, such as psychology, philosophy, sociology, cultural studies, media studies.

Examples of possible topics include:

  • Sexuality
  • Diversity, Inclusion and Privilege
  • Christianity and Islam
  • Bereavement
  • Environment and Creation Care

Students will be required to attend the appropriate classes, to follow them up with additional recommended reading, to keep a reflective learning journal throughout the delivery of the module, and to participate in group discussions and group work leading to the group project. Students should be particularly aware that the challenge and the benefit of this module is the opportunity to work with others from different backgrounds.

This module is to enable participants to engage in independent learning related to a chosen subject area in the context of discipleship, mission and ministry. In consultation and negotiation with the tutor, participants will identify a topic, issue, or ministerial area relevant to the study of the theory and practice of ministry and in which there is academic expertise in the Cambridge Theological Federation. An independent learning project will be developed which may include both library and practical research. The area chosen may enhance and integrate study from the taught module programme providing the independent study is clearly distinguished from the content of such taught modules.
This module is to enable participants to engage in independent learning related to a chosen subject area in the context of discipleship, mission and ministry. In consultation and negotiation with the tutor, participants will identify a topic, issue, or ministerial area relevant to the study of the theory and practice of ministry and in which there is academic expertise in the Cambridge Theological Federation. An independent learning project will be developed which may include both library and practical research. The area chosen may enhance and integrate study from the taught module programme providing the independent study is clearly distinguished from the content of such taught modules.
A dissertation provides an opportunity to develop research skills and inquiry-based learning and to lay the foundations for possible future work at a higher degree level. Participants will, in consultation and negotiation with the tutor, identify a topic, issue, or ministerial area relevant to the study of theology, ministry and mission. The proposed title of the dissertation, together with a brief description and initial bibliography, must be submitted for approval by the Examination Board.

The student is responsible for arranging supervisions and organising a timetable and plan for his/her work. An introductory meeting with the year group will introduce the dissertation and explain the process for approving the proposed topic. The area chosen may enhance and integrate study from the taught module programme provided that the independent study is clearly distinguished from the content of such taught modules.

This module is an introduction to the theology, origins, history, practice, and relevance of Christian mission in a global world. It requires students to reflect theologically on the missionary character of the Christian faith, paying particular attention to reflections from Christians in history and around the world. It will engage with objections to the theological foundations and historical record of Christian mission, and identify implications of these themes for mission and ministry in the contemporary postcolonial and postmodern environment.

The module will introduce students to some of the core concepts and current debates in mission studies. Particular attention will be devoted to the holism of mission, the nature of Christian witness in a religiously plural world, the pneumatological turn in missional thinking, reconciliation as mission, contextual hermeneutics and so forth. In focusing upon contexts, issues of globalisation, migration, climate change and marginalisation will be highlighted.