Papers offered

Papers offered 2016-11-17T10:27:38+00:00

Below is a list of the different papers offered for the DTM. Please note that not all papers are offered each year.

Aims
This paper will cover principles of Hebrew grammar and syntax, translation from Hebrew into English and textual criticism as exemplified in a set text prescribed by the Faculty Board.

Objectives
On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Identify Hebrew words and use standard lexicons, commentaries and theological wordbooks
  2. Understand the basic grammatical rules of Biblical Hebrew
  3. Understand the principles of Hebrew syntax
  4. Translate straightforward Biblical Hebrew prose
  5. Apply Hebrew thought forms in the exegesis of Biblical texts
  6. Critically compare published translations of OT texts
  7. Have a basic understanding of and be able to use the textual apparatus in their Hebrew Bible
Aims
This paper will contain questions on Hebrew grammar and passages for translation, linguistic comment, pointing and re-translation from a portion or portions of the Old Testament prescribed by the Faculty Board.

Objectives
On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Understand the grammatical rules and principles of syntax of Biblical Hebrew
  2. Recognize the most significant vocabulary of Hebrew Biblical prose texts
  3. Understand and make basic use of the critical apparatus of the Hebrew Bible
  4. Translate straightforward Biblical Hebrew prose
  5. Translate verses from the set text back into Hebrew
  6. Point unpointed Hebrew text of the set texts
Aims
The paper will cover principles of New Testament Greek grammar and syntax, and translation from Greek to English and textual criticism as exemplified in a set text prescribed by the Faculty Board.

Objectives
On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Read and translate the Greek of the Set Text
  2. Understand basic Greek grammar and syntax
  3. Critically compare published translations of NT texts
  4. Recognize the most significant vocabulary in the Greek NT
  5. Relate issues of grammar and syntax to idiomatic translation
  6. Have a basic understanding of and be able to use the textual apparatus in their Greek NT
Aims
The paper will contain passages for translation from one or more portions of the Gospels which the Board shall from time to time prescribe, together with questions on the grammar of Hellenistic Greek.

Objectives
On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Read and translate the Greek of the Set Text
  2. Understand the grammar and syntax of the Set Text
  3. Use knowledge acquired in reading the Set Text, in translating other New Testament texts
  4. Discriminate between different English translations of the Set Text
  5. Relate issues of grammar and syntax to idiomatic translation
  6. Develop some fluency in reading New Testament Greek
Aims
This paper aims to introduce some critical and theological perspectives on the Christian Bible, both Old and New Testaments. There will be a combination of surveys of significant sections of the Bible and a more detailed look at selected primary texts. The challenge of interpreting the Bible in its historical, canonical and contemporary context will be explored.

Objectives
On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an outline knowledge of the Christian Bible
  2. Show an awareness of the challenge of reading the Biblical texts in their historical and canonical context
  3. Evaluate a range of interpretations of selected biblical texts
  4. Begin to articulate how it is possible to read the Bible from a Christian point of view
Aims
This paper aims to introduce some of the central concerns of theology in the light of the Christian reflection on the person and work of Jesus Christ. The primary texts studied will include theological texts from different periods of the Christian tradition.

Objectives
On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a capacity to read texts theologically
  2. Identify the central doctrines of the Christian Faith
  3. Evaluate the thinking behind their classical formulation and contemporary discussion of them
  4. Articulate a view of a number of key issues in theology in relation to the person and work of Jesus Christ
Aims
This module aims to introduce students to the study of the Church in historical context. Students will be familiarised with the practices, methods, and modes of Church history through the examination of specified historical period or periods. This module seeks to equip the student with a firm grasp of the historical experience of the Church as a foundation for further study in Church history, doctrine, liturgy, and pastoral practice.

The module will require students to engage with the historical experience of the Church in a specified period or periods. As appropriate to the specified time-frame, particular attention will be paid to the historical context of the formation of Christian doctrine, the nature of the Church’s self-understanding and self-expression, her relations with, and her interaction with other religious and philosophical traditions. Due attention must also be paid to the variety of Christian experience in the specified periods.

Objectives
On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the history of the Church in its context during the specified period(s) and relate that understanding to the contemporary Christian experience
  2. Identify the chief issues and themes of the specified period(s) with relation to the formation of Christian identity, doctrine and mission
  3. Show an informed understanding of the Church’s engagement with other religious and philosophical traditions evident in the specified period(s)
  4. Make appropriate and informed use of primary materials
  5. demonstrate an awareness of contemporary and broad (rather than simply confessional) historiographical approaches to the Christian past
  6. compare the recent experience of different church traditions
  7. appreciate the extent to which Christianity has been, and remains in controversial dialogue with its cultural and political context
  8. evaluate recent trends in Christian mission and social thought against an historical background
Aims
To provide an introduction to the history and theology of the Western and English Church in the late medieval and Reformation periods, with specific attention to movements of reform and renewal both within the Catholic Church and outside it, i.e. Protestantism.

Objectives

Students study two topics, specified by the Faculty Board, designed to raise different and complementary aspects of the main theme. In the course of this work they should acquire a good knowledge of the main aspects of the two topics, and should also explore the comparative questions of structure and method arising from them.

Section A: The Protestant Reformation in Europe, ca. 1517-1618

Students should

  • Acquire an understanding of the emergence of one of Western Christianity’s most distinctive movements, the Protestant Reformation.
  • learn about the doctrinal and disciplinary features of the two major forms into which ‘the Reformation’ crystallised (the ‘evangelical’ or Lutheran and the Calvinist or ‘Reformed’ traditions) as well as about the ways and means in which Reformation ideas and practices were disseminated and enforced.
  • be able to comment upon the relationship between Reformation movements and political forces and authorities.
  • be expected to consider why the Reformation movement was unable to maintain a unified front in the face of its common enemy and the limits as well as the extent of Reformation success.

Section B: The Catholic Reformation in Europe, ca. 1492-1618

Students should

  • acquire a good knowledge of the main areas of revivalist activity — e.g. the Council of Trent, reform at Rome, the new religious orders, and the attempt to reform popular religion
  • develop some understanding of the dynamics of change within an institution whose self-image was of changeless continuity.

Section C: Theological and comparative issues, and the English Reformation

Students should:

  • Consolidate their understanding of the more specific issues in sections A and B, i.e. Justification, Scripture and Tradition, the Eucharist, Image and Iconoclasm.
  • show an understanding of the varied interpretations of the English Reformation
Aims
The paper offers students an introduction to the theology, history, and practice of Christian movements outside the Euro-Atlantic world, with a particular focus on Africa, Asia and Latin America. It engages with issues of culture and power within Christianity worldwide and demonstrates the variety of Christian expression. It introduces students to theological, sociological, and historical approaches to the study of religious movements.

Objectives
On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. A broad knowledge of a variety of local appropriations of Christianity.
  2. An understanding of Christianity’s meanings and social and political significance in different eras and settings.
  3. An ability to draw constructively on the insights of a range of disciplines such as history, theology, social anthropology, sociology and political science.
Aims
This paper will aim to give candidates a broad introduction to the sociology and psychology of religion, including many of the topics that are currently being studied most actively.

The sociology part of this paper will offer a broad introduction to the sociological study of religion with a particular focus on understanding developments in Britain since 1945 including secularisation, charismatic religion, the New Age, new religious movements and multiculturalism.

The Psychology for Ministry aspect will include both empirical investigation of religion from a psychological standpoint, and also more discursive topics such as the psychoanalytic perspective on religion, the relationship between psychology and theology, and the general appraisal of contemporary psychology of religion.

Objectives
On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Have a broad understanding of key topics in the empirical psychology of religion
  2. Be able to identify and critique a range of theoretical and methodological issues
  3. Be able to discuss the implications for Christian ministry
Aims
The overall aims will be to introduce students to the language, syntax, exegesis and theology of the Set Texts on the basis of the Hebrew text. Students will acquire not only a more advanced knowledge of Biblical Hebrew and the basic skills of exegesis, but will also relate these to the identification and interpretation of key historical and theological issues in one or more of the set texts.

Objectives
The study of the texts from Deuteronomy, Judges, and Jonah is designed (apart from their intrinsic interest) to lead students on to a fuller appreciation of the syntax of prose texts (including the significance of word order and the less common uses of the tenses of the verb). Throughout the course lectures and private study are expected to be supplemented by fortnightly supervision work on translation from English into Hebrew, which will be tested in the examination. The lectures will focus mainly on linguistic aspects of the texts, but their theological and literary aspects will explored in two or three essays which students will write in the course of the year. By the end of the year students are expected (a) to have developed their understanding of Hebrew to an intermediate level, involving familiarity with the varied syntactical structures of prose texts; (b) to have acquired a knowledge of some major aspects of the content of at least two of the set texts.

Aims
The paper will contain passages for translation and comment from one or more portions of New Testament text which the Board shall from time to time prescribe.

Objectives
The overall objective will be to introduce students to the language, syntax, exegesis and theology of the Set Texts on the basis of the Greek text. Students will acquire not only a more advanced knowledge of New Testament Greek and the basic skills of exegesis, but will also relate these to the identification and interpretation of key historical and theological issues in a gospel and an epistle.

Aims
The paper will introduce students to the exilic age and the critical examination of texts associated with this period.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Show a detailed knowledge of the Old Testament material studied.
  2. Engage with scholarly enquiry into the material’s original context and meaning
  3. Understand the theological perspectives of the material and its author(s)
  4. Relate the material to Christian ministry and life
Aims
This paper will provide for close study of text from one or more books of the New Testament, as prescribed by the Faculty Board and studied through attendance at Tripos Lectures for B4 (The Letters of Paul). It will be concerned with the background, content, theology, and interpretation of the material; and with questions arising from the use of the material in Christian faith and practice.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Show detailed knowledge of the New Testament material studied
  2. Engage with scholarly enquiry into the material’s original context and meaning
  3. Understand the theological perspectives of the material and its author(s)
  4. Relate the material to their own situations in ministry and living
Aims
This paper will provide for the close study of one or more Old Testament texts or themes from a selection prescribed by the Faculty Board. It will be concerned with the background, content, theology and interpretation of the relevant Old Testament material, and with questions regarding the use of the material in Christian faith and practice.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Show detailed knowledge of the content of the prescribed Old Testament material.
  2. Critically discuss the material’s origins and development and meaning
  3. Understand the theological perspective of the material and its author(s)
  4. Comment on points of difficulty within the prescribed material
  5. Show awareness of the hermeneutical possibilities of the prescribed material
  6. Relate the prescribed material to Christian faith and practice
Aims
This paper will provide for close study of text from one or more books of the New Testament, or of one, as prescribed by the Faculty Board. It will be concerned with the background, content, theology, and interpretation of the material; and with questions arising from the use of the material in Christian faith and practice.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Show detailed knowledge of the content of the prescribed New Testament material.
  2. Critically discuss the material’s origins, development and meaning.
  3. Understand the theological perspectives of the material and its author(s)
  4. Comment on points of difficulty within the prescribed material.
  5. Show awareness of the hermeneutical possibilities of the prescribed material.
  6. Relate the prescribed material to Christian faith and practice.
Aims
To introduce students to the discipline of biblical theology, by exploring, in dialogue with key interpreters, a number of pivotal theological themes as they are discernible in specific Scriptural texts, and as they relate to the doctrines and practices of the Church.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Discern, clarify and explicate some of the unifying theological patterns that give the Scriptural canon its shape and coherence
  2. Demonstrate the ways in which readings of Scripture are related to the church’s subsequent formulation of later, post-biblical doctrine
  3. Assess the importance of biblical narrative, in particular the Bible’s witness to the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, to recent Christology and trinitarian theology.
  4. Critically explore the theological and liturgical significance to the contemporary church of key moments in the narratives of the gospels and Acts.
Aims
This paper relates the history, theology, and debates in the study of Christian mission to the context and future ministry of students. Particular emphasis will be given to questions of Christianity and culture, the mixed heritage and present emphasis in the church on “mission,” and to learning from the experience of the world church.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. articulate a theological understanding of the centrality of mission to the identity and purpose of the church
  2. reflect critically on some of the key issues in contemporary missiological debate
  3. respond with informed and creative insight to the contemporary challenges facing Western churches
  4. develop the ability to engage with sensitivity and theological integrity in encounters with those of other faiths.
Aims
This paper will examine theologically the relationship between the gospel and Western culture. It examines the intellectual, social and religious trends in both modernity and postmodernity that help to shape people’s thinking in the 21st century, and explores their impact on contemporary church life and practice. The module will combine a theoretical knowledge of cultural developments with the necessary skills for engaging with Western culture from a Christian perspective. It will engage with wider ecumenical and inter-faith perspectives, as well as to develop appropriate and theologically coherent strategies for missionary engagement and involvement in contemporary society.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Articulate an understanding of the major cultural trends within contemporary society and how the gospel might be contextualised in a society characterised by religious and cultural pluralism
  2. Articulate a coherent understanding of the theological grounds on which Christian faith might engage with contemporary culture
  3. Apply lessons learnt from the analysis of cultural trends to the mission of the church in contemporary society
  4. Develop an understanding of appropriate models of witness for churches situated within multi-faith and multi-cultural communities
Aims
This paper aims to broaden and deepen students’ understanding of philosophical theology by exposure to the some of the most influential thinkers in the Western intellectual tradition and to enable students to be skilled interpreters of the theological tradition in relation to contemporary intellectual challenges.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Reflect critically on primary issues in philosophical theology, namely God’s nature and relationship to the world.
  2. Sensitively interpret the relation between issues in fundamental or philosophical theology and issues of contemporary concern such as divine action, and the problem of evil.
  3. Demonstrate a subtle understanding of the interplay between the ancient and modern philosophical tradition and theology.
Aims
To explore critically the theological roots and pastoral implications of a variety of approaches to the subject, with particular reference to contemporary ecclesiological questions, and to the doctrine of Eucharist.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Show a critical and thoughtful awareness of the impact of a variety of ecclesiological approaches on pastoral practice
  2. Exercise an informed reflective intelligence in relation to the ecumenical issues arising in the areas of church and sacraments today
  3. Relate sacramental and church thinking to questions of mission and ethics
  4. Develop a deeper understanding of Eucharistic theology and doctrine in relation to church, Christology, symbol and theological language and other related themes in systematic theology
Aims

  1. To introduce theological concepts shaping and shaped by Christian worship. To relate the study of worship to the study of doctrine and history, helping students to understand how worship has evolved in a variety of historical contexts and enabling them to relate this to developments in contemporary worship, drawing on a variety of traditions, especially those represented within the Cambridge Theological Federation.
  2. To introduce features of contemporary culture and pastoral concerns which affect the ways in which Christians worship is understood and performed. To introduce the phenomenology of word and story, symbol and ritual and explore the potential of this understanding for planning and interpreting worship. The focus includes eucharistic and initiation liturgy, services of the word and pastoral offices.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Give an account of biblical and doctrinal foundations of Trinitarian worship
  2. Appreciate the historical development of eucharistic and baptismal worship and apply this historical insight critically to revisions and developments in contemporary worship.
  3. Apply insights relating to the phenomenology of word, symbol and ritual in worship to interpretation and planning of worship.
  4. Begin to relate pastoral concerns to the effective interpretation and use of the pastoral offices.
Prescribed Topic (A): Christian Spirituality in Historical Context

Outline Content

The course will deal with the emergence of some of the major themes of the Christian spiritual tradition. It will also consider the impact of contemporary issues on the way in which the tradition is interpreted today.

  • Spirituality in a secular age [AC], Monday 12 October at 4 pm [DH in Romania]
  • Spirituality in a secular age II [AC], 19 October
  • Martyr spirituality [DH], 26 October
  • Desert spirituality (St Anthony the Great) [DH], 2 November
  • Benedictine spirituality [CW], 9 November
  • Ignatius of Loyola (The Spiritual Exercises) [AC], 16 November
  • Teresa of Avila [AC], 23 November
  • Icons (the role of the material in the spiritual life) [DH], 30 November [AC in South Africa]

There are 7 topics, but the first one will be a double session.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Show familiarity with the main themes of Christian spirituality
  2. Understand the historical contexts in which these themes developed
  3. Compare and contrast different spiritual traditions
  4. Evaluate both traditional and ‘new age’ approaches to spirituality

Prescribed Topic (C): Anglicanism

Outline Content

The course will deal with the major issues of Anglican identity including Anglican approaches to scripture, authority, inclusiveness, the parish system, liturgy, inculturation and the management of diversity.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. sketch the historical development of the ecclesia Anglicana from early British Christianity to global communion
  2. outline the major themes of Anglican identity
  3. describe and critique the principles of Anglican ecclesiology
  4. summarise the key liturgical and doctrinal sources in Anglicanism
  5. assess the significance and impact of current developments in the Anglican Communion.
Aims
Individually negotiated through the Faculty Board. See also Supplementary Regulations.

Objectives
As approved by the Faculty Board.

Aims
To broaden and deepen students’ understanding of the nature and tasks of Christian theology by means of an in-depth study of one area of Christian doctrine from a list approved by the Faculty Board. The topic approved for 2015-2016 is Political Theology.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Outline and assess the ways in which key figures in the Christian tradition have contributed to political thought and practice.
  2. Reflect critically on the contribution of contemporary Christian theology to conceptualisations of political society.
  3. Analyse contemporary political debates theologically, including the nature and practice of democracy, the significance of the human rights discourse, the compatibility of Christianity with political liberalism, etc.
Aims
This paper will introduce students to the advanced study of Church history including the sophisticated handling of primary sources and engages with the historiography of the subject. On completion of the course students will be able to demonstrate a critical understanding of the interplay between the ideas of Christian Doctrine, the institutional development of the church and the social, political, economic and cultural context of the church. The Faculty Board will prescribe up to 4 topics which may be studied in each year, students will study one topic.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. A broad knowledge of a variety of local appropriations of Christianity and their change.
  2. An understanding of Christianity’s meanings and social and political significance in different eras and settings.
  3. An ability to draw constructively on the insights of a range of disciplines such as history, theology, social anthropology, sociology and political science.
Aims
This module seeks to explore Judaism, Islam and Christianity and the relationships between them in order to engage the worldview of the student with the worldview of these faith communities. This will be achieved by encountering and experiencing diversity which lies at the heart of this engagement. It provides an initial orientation of facts and beliefs pertinent to Judaism and Islam ; from this students will reflect on issues of identity and diversity in multi-faith Britain and focus on thematic and contextual issues around which communities are formed, such as sources of authority in faith communities and relationships to the divine.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Articulate an understanding of the life and practice of Judaism and Islam
  2. Reflect critically on the complex issues of faith, culture and identity in multifaith Britain
  3. Demonstrate evidence of creative engagement and encounter with those communities and how such engagement affects the students’ world view
  4. Develop practical skills in communicating those engagements within the Christian community
Aims
The module aims to develop in students mature and well-informed habits in moral thinking, appreciation and judgment appropriate to a Christian teaching and pastoral ministry, and to Christian living.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Understand the variety of ethical views and approaches within the Christian Church
  2. Develop a range and depth of knowledge in a particular area of ethics
  3. Critically evaluate the various sources on which Christians draw in their moral thinking
  4. Articulate a sensitive, coherent and engaged position on ethical issues
Aims
This paper will introduce students to current debates in feminist interpretations of the Bible.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Identify key issues in feminist interpretation of the Bible
  2. Apply a feminist hermeneutic to specific biblical passages
  3. Evaluate feminist contributions to a Christian understanding and appropriation of the Bible as the word of God
  4. Articulate a personal response to feminist perspectives on biblical interpretation
  5. Apply insights from feminist perspectives to the pastoral use of the Bible
Aims
To explore a variety of issues in Christian ethics, including topics not covered in paper 19 but building upon the foundations established in that course.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Understand the variety of ethical views and approaches within the Christian Church
  2. Have an increased awareness of the contemporary ethical climate
  3. Develop a range and depth of knowledge in one area of specific ethical application.
  4. Critically evaluate the various sources on which Christians draw in their moral thinking
  5. Articulate a sensitive, coherent and engaged position on ethical issues
  6. Show an understanding of how moral thought and practice is linked to the life and worship of the Church
Aims
To outline and explore theological understandings of the person and work of the Holy Spirit in historical and contemporary Christianity.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Outline and assess a variety of ways in which key figures in the Christian tradition have contributed to the articulation of the doctrines of the Holy Spirit
  2. Outline the major points of agreement and disagreement in historical and contemporary debates about the person and work of the Holy Spirit.
  3. Develop a range and depth of knowledge in one area of specific thinking in relation to the Holy Spirit.
  4. Show an understanding of how the thinking about the Holy Spirit relates to the life and worship of the Church
  5. Appreciate some of the ways in which Christian thought and practice in relation to the Holy Spirit informs contemporary ecumenism.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to reflect theologically on experiences of the Holy Spirit’s presence and work

Aims

  • To explore a single theological locus in depth
  • To demonstrate how a doctrinal topic may be approached in a variety of ways.
  • To explore how several theological issues may be brought into focus through a single doctrinal lens.
  • To explore what it means for Christian theology to be hopeful.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  • Have advanced and detailed knowledge of one doctrinal locus
  • Have experience of integrating historical theological sources with systematic/doctrinal theology
  • Be able to inflect all theological reflection with hope
Aims
Individually negotiated through the Faculty Board

Objectives
As approved by the Faculty Board

Aims
The Pastoral Portfolio is the most distinctive feature of the BTh degree. It is designed to test your development as a practical theologian within the context of a vocational award which seeks to relate academic learning to pastoral practice, contexts and growth in self-awareness. Pastoral papers are compulsory in both the first (BTh 51) and second (BTh 52) examination years. BTh 51 is a half paper. BTh 52 is the equivalent to 1.5 papers.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate development as a Christian who reflects theologically on their own engagement with the church and the world
  2. Engage with the discipline of pastoral theology, its literature and sources
  3. Integrate previous experience with their vocational development in dialogue with other parts of the BTh degree and life within the Cambridge Theological Federation
  4. Show how their own background, assumptions and perceptions influence their theology
Aims
The Pastoral Portfolio is the most distinctive feature of the BTh degree. It is designed to test your development as a practical theologian in the context of a vocational award which seeks to relate academic learning to pastoral practice, contexts and growth in self-awareness. BTh52 is designed to build upon and develop the pastoral theology undertaken in Paper BTh51 in the 1st Exam Year. Paper BTh52 is a compulsory paper equivalent to 1.5 papers. It is also compulsory to pass BTh52 in order to be awarded the BTh Degree.

It is envisaged that throughout your whole degree course you will be involved in placements of various kinds and in reflective practice groups that enable you to think theologically about practical issues facing British society and the Church. You should plan these placements and opportunities for reflection together with your Director of Pastoral Studies. These should include at least one social context placement, usually chosen from a menu offered by the CTF, and at least one placement in a church, either in this country or abroad. The portfolio is an opportunity to demonstrate your development as a Christian who reflects theologically on your own engagement with the church and the world.

Objectives

On successful completion of this Paper students will be able to:

  • Evidence of engagement with practical contexts: Work should clearly arise from your placements and life experience and demonstrate wrestling with issues that are relevant to others in these contexts as well as yourself.
  • Awareness of your own views and roles: The portfolio should demonstrate an understanding that the knowledge you have gained through study and experience is situated and from a particular perspective. The examiners will be keen to see how your views have developed and changed through study and practical engagement with places and other people.
  • Engagement with relevant literature and appropriate use of texts, referencing, bibliography etc.: Pastoral theology is a discipline with a literature. You will be expected to have read some key pastoral theology texts and to have an understanding of appropriate methodology in the work you present. Your work should show evidence of reading and be referenced in the same way as other academic writing.
  • Theological engagement suitable to degree level study: The examiners are looking for evidence that you are able to draw on appropriate areas of study to think about the key issues in your portfolio. You will be expected to demonstrate the same sophistication in the use of biblical texts or psychology of religion, for example, as you do in your biblical or psychology papers.