Below is a list of the different Undergraduate modules offered for the Common Awards in Theology, Ministry and Mission. Please note that not all modules are offered each year.

This module will offer students an initial overview of the New Testament, of the various genres of literature that are found in it and of the major theological themes its writings raise. It will present the contexts and concerns out of which the New Testament books emerged, set them within their broader historical, religious and cultural backgrounds, and examine the ways that the ancient authors expressed both particular pastoral concerns and more general theological convictions. Further, the module will explore some of the ways in which the New Testament has been handled and used in various eras and contexts, and will allow careful consideration of what might constitute appropriate interpretation and use of these books in today’s church and world. Students will be encouraged to read the whole New Testament in the course of their work on the module.
This module provides an initial overview of the Old Testament. The teaching is oriented around some of the key genres, since understanding the kinds of literature in the Old Testament provides important guidance about how to interpret texts appropriately in their historical, literary and cultural context. Some of the tools, methods and approaches used in modern biblical scholarship are also introduced, paying attention to their limitations as well as their strengths. Particular attention is paid to the tension between historical critical and literary approaches to the text.

In addition students will be given an overview of the developing plot of the Old Testament as it traces the journey of the people of God through the Pentateuch, the historical books, the prophets, and on towards the New Testament. Guidance is given about how to acknowledge the contingent and temporary character of much of the Old Testament, while affirming how it remains a vital theological and historical foundation for later Christian life and thought.

The aim of this module is to introduce beginners in New Testament Greek to basic elements of the language through engagement with one chapter of the Gospel of John. It will focus on basic grammar and syntax, encourage students to learn vocabulary, and to read and write basic Greek. It will help students begin to understand issues associated with the task of translating ancient texts into modern English, in relation to language, literary style and theology. This module will equip students with the skills necessary to progress onto the module TMM1077 Continuing New Testament Greek.
The aim of this module is to enable students to develop a deeper understanding of New Testament Greek. It consolidates everything covered in module TMM1067 and further develops students’ understanding of Greek grammar and syntax. It is based on reading and translating the set text (four chapters from the Gospel of John, plus material from the course text book.

Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which the Biblical text may be translated into English. This module will thus equip students with the confidence to use significant reference resources that refer to the Greek (lexicons, concordances, dictionaries, commentaries, etc.). It will enable them to engage with the Greek texts in Level 5 and 6 exegesis work if they choose these options. It will inculcate the ability to evaluate different English translations of New Testament material, especially those widely used in church life.

The aim of this module is to introduce students to basic elements of Biblical Hebrew through engagement with four chapters of the original text of the Old Testament. It will focus on basic grammar and syntax, encourage students to learn vocabulary, and to read and write Biblical Hebrew.  It will help students begin to understand issues associated with the task of translating ancient texts into modern English, in relation to language, literary style and theology. This module will equip students with the skills necessary to progress onto the module TMM1097 Continuing Biblical Hebrew: Text Study.
The aim of this module is to enable students to develop a deeper understanding of Biblical Hebrew, developing students’ understanding of Hebrew grammar and syntax.  It is based on reading and translating the set text, five chapters of narrative prose from the Hebrew Bible; and further chapters of the course text book.

Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which the Biblical text may be translated into English. The module will thus equip students with the confidence to use significant reference resources that refer to the Hebrew (lexicons, concordances, dictionaries, commentaries, etc.).  It will enable them to engage with the Hebrew texts in Level 5 and 6 exegesis work if they choose these options.  It will inculcate the ability to evaluate different English translations of Old Testament material, especially those widely used in church life.

This module builds foundations for ongoing study in Christian Doctrine and History. The module will explore sources for theological discourse and it will explore the grounds for a specifically Christian history from the emergence of ‘people called Christians’, to a persecuted sect, to an official religion within the Empire. Students will be familiarized with the practices, methods and modes of Christian history through the examination of specified historical periods. Alongside this, the way Christians have known and described God as Creator, as the Son who came to save and as the Spirit who is the Life-giver will be explored.  These foundations will be rooted in the life of the Church both in the sense of locating where that belief emerges from but also how it is held through the creeds and how it helps to re-shape the church today. It is hoped that by exploring the voices which have gone before, students can both make sense of the framework in which belief is set but in which they can also find their own voices.
The module provides students with an introduction to ongoing ministerial training and study.  The module acts as a gateway into professional ministerial practice rooted in comprehensive theological study, practice wisdom and a deepening faith.  In this module students will be introduced to theological reflective practice as the method of ongoing ministerial development.  Theological reflective practice combines in-depth theological study with considered analysis of self and context.  The module will provide students with an introduction to these three key components of ongoing ministerial development alongside study support to provide a bridge into degree level study.
This module is designed to provide students with an introduction to the Five Marks of Mission, which express the Anglican Communion’s common commitment to, and understanding of, God’s holistic and integral mission.  The module will introduce students to each of the Five Marks, examining both their theological and biblical foundations, as well as gaining insights from the world church. It will also explore ways in which each Mark might be given practical expression in the local context. As part of the module, students will work collaboratively to produce a resource for local churches designed to introduce the Five Marks to local Christians.
This module is designed to enable participants to engage in independent learning related to a chosen subject area in the context of discipleship, mission and ministry. In consultation and negotiation with the tutor, participants will identify a topic, issue, or ministerial area relevant to the study of the theory and practice of ministry and in which there is academic expertise in the Cambridge Theological Federation. An independent learning project will be developed which may include both library and practical research. The area chosen may enhance and integrate study from the taught module programme providing the independent study is clearly distinguished from the content of such taught modules.
Students enrolled on this module will be engaged in a sustained placement or place of work which, together with prior experience, forms the substrate for reflection on: the nature of ministry, mission and vocation and their relation to ecclesiology. Biblical and theological foundations for the church’s participation in the mission of God will be considered, alongside biblical and theological foundations for collaborative ministry. The aim will be to develop leadership skills for analysing a community / congregation alongside theological reflection methodologies for reflective practice. Students will focus on these subjects in relation to their own denomination and ecclesial tradition.
This module introduces students to the practice of church planting and the creation and sustaining of new expressions of church. The module will encourage students to consider the creation of new Christian communities in light of doctrinal themes such as atonement and Christology, while rooting practice in theological reflection.

The module provides an opportunity for students to critically dialogue with their ministerial and missional practice in light of existing, developing and new knowledge at a foundational level.  The process demands of the students’ an attentiveness to their own assumptions and biases as they develop an integrated approach to pioneer ministry. Context–based learning creates opportunity for deeper understanding of familiar settings in creative conversation with key themes from relevant disciplines, including: Christology, ecclesiology, missiology, and cultural studies (amongst others).

This module will offer students introductory material exploring some of the major themes and issues relating to pastoral care in congregational contexts. The place of pastoral care in the life and worship of Christian communities will be examined and assessed. Students will be encouraged to begin to develop the skills and dispositions required to offer sustained and appropriate pastoral care in ways that do justice to context and to their own roles and experience. These explorations will pay attention to scriptural models and a range of Christian traditions. They will also be informed by relevant material drawn from the social sciences and psychology where these offer insights into human development and life processes both for individuals and for groups. The module will offer students opportunities to practice and enhance skills that are essential within the pastoral ministries of the Church. This will include careful attention when listening, and an appreciation of the significance of loss and grief as a worked example of pastoral care. It will also enable students to begin to engage with best practice in safeguarding, child protection and the protection of vulnerable adults. As an introductory course this module will, inevitably, connect with some material in more superficial ways than at depth. It will provide starting points for further study, engagement and formation and a range of resources with which to continue to grow into the ministries of pastoral care.
This module will offer students introductory material exploring some of the major themes and issues relating to pastoral care in congregational contexts. The place of pastoral care in the life and worship of Christian communities will be examined and assessed. Students will be encouraged to begin to develop the skills and dispositions required to offer sustained and appropriate pastoral care in ways that do justice to context and to their own roles and experience. These explorations will pay attention to scriptural models and a range of Christian traditions. They will also be informed by relevant material drawn from the social sciences and psychology where these offer insights into human development and life processes both for individuals and for groups. The module will offer students opportunities to practice and enhance skills that are essential within the pastoral ministries of the Church. This will include careful attention when listening, and an appreciation of the significance of loss and grief as a worked example of pastoral care. It will also enable students to begin to engage with best practice in safeguarding, child protection and the protection of vulnerable adults.  As an introductory course this module will, inevitably, connect with some material in more superficial ways than at depth. It will provide starting points for further study, engagement and formation and a range of resources with which to continue to grow into the ministries of pastoral care.
This module involves a partnership between a student’s training institution and a ministerial context which enables students to encounter, and work effectively within, a specific ministerial setting. On-site staff will provide day-to-day supervision with tutors in the students learning organisation facilitating reflection and deep learning.

The module provides an opportunity for students to critically dialogue with their ministerial and missional practice in light of existing, developing and new knowledge at a foundational level.  The process demands of the students’ an attentiveness to their own assumptions and biases as they develop an integrated approach to ministry and mission within their specialism. Ministerial-based learning creates opportunity for deeper understanding of familiar settings in creative conversation with key themes from relevant disciplines, including: biblical, ecclesiastical and doctrinal studies, missiology, education and cultural studies (amongst others).

This module involves a partnership between a student’s training institution and a given placement, ministerial or work-based context which enables students to encounter, and work effectively within, such a setting. On-site staff and/or relevant staff in the students’ own training institution will provide supervision. Supervisors will report in writing on a student’s participation in the placement.

It provides an introduction to skills in understanding and analysing context and integrating theological enquiry with pastoral / ministerial /professional practice. It demands of students attentiveness to their own assumptions and biases. Placement, ministerial or work-based learning creates opportunity for deeper understanding of an unfamiliar setting in creative conversation with key themes from relevant disciplines, including biblical and doctrinal studies, missiology, sociology and anthropology (amongst many).

Students will be expected to agree a plan of activities with their placement supervisor, which takes into account specific learning outcomes agreed by their Director of Pastoral Studies/ Director of Practical Theology. Students will be expected to work with a journal of their experiences; research their context fully using available resources and apply methods of reading and/or profiling a context, provide verbatim and other accounts of pastoral encounters and ‘critical incidents’ for analysis in a group context and reflect with a placement supervisor on their own development. Group teaching on specific areas of contextual and pastoral ministry will be linked to independent reading and research as well as to the material students bring to the group for reflection.

This module is offered in two iterations, one for students on the PC3 pathway, and one for those not on the PC3 pathway.

This module will offer students knowledge of good practice in developing purposeful relationships with children and families. Theories around relationships, communication and listening skills with children will be explored. It will cover the principles and practice of play, with attention to creating play spaces and designing play processes. This module will provide content about learning processes and methods. The module will provide opportunities for the students to learn about leadership, team theory, self-management and administration skills. There will be opportunities for the student to engage in theological reflection on practice and experience they have gained through this module.
This module will offer students knowledge of good practice in developing purposeful relationships in youth work. Theories around relationship, communication and listening skills will be explored. The module will provide the opportunity for skills development in delivering informal, semi-formal and formal education. Learning styles, processes and methods of education will be included. The module will provide opportunities for the students to learn about leadership, team theory, self-management and administration skills. There will be opportunities for the student to engage in theological reflection on practice and experience gained through this module.
This module offers an introduction to Christian worship for the purposes of preparation for public ministry. Its perspectives are ecumenical, historical, theological and phenomenological, and it aims to help students to root their own experience and tradition within the wider contexts of the Christian faith, as well as to grow in confidence in their ability to interpret and apply their learning to their specific ministerial setting.

The historical material will provide a general overview of the origins and development of forms of Christian worship. The phenomenological study will have as its primary focus the two dominical sacraments of baptism and eucharist, as well as the proclamation of the word. The emphasis will be on the Western liturgical tradition, though reference will be made where appropriate to Eastern practice.

The practical aspects of the module will include discussion of contemporary contextual challenges, and the need to negotiate faithfulness to the inherited tradition in situations of change and complexity. Tradition-specific practice will be covered elsewhere in tradition-specific contexts, though many of the tools that enable us to work within such contexts will be introduced in the module.

This module is offered for students on the PC3 (context-based) pathway. It involves a partnership between the students’ training institution and a given context. The module comprises:

  • Regular guided practical experience of mission and ministry, normally with a team of other students, in the parish / congregation / pioneer initiative / mission project and the wider community throughout the year of study. This enables students to work effectively and collaboratively within a sustained setting that offers both ecclesial and non-ecclesial ministerial and mission experience.
  • An introduction to theological reflection methodologies and to methods for analysing and reading a context. Both personal and collaborative theological reflection is practiced.
  • Contextual engagement with key themes of relevant disciplines, with a particular focus on opportunities to develop understanding and practice of pastoral care and mission.
  • Supervision by on-site staff (usually the church / project leader) and a tutor in the students’ own training institution.
The aim of this module is to help students better understand the Bible within its original context (as that can best be reconstructed), and as it has been interpreted in many different contexts during history in order that students can develop good practice in using the Bible within their own contexts today.

Using selected Old and New Testament texts, the module will survey different approaches to these texts and ways people have explored the world behind the text, in the text and in front of the text and applied the text to their own context. Connections will be made between Old and New Testament themes in an attempt to develop a nuanced biblical hermeneutic that is consistent in its treatment of the whole Bible. We will explore what makes for better or worse applications in a particular context and attempt to critically assess one’s own interpretations and those of others.

The aim of this module is to understand, and begin to make use of, the insights that close critical reading can give into the interpretation of a particular text from the Old Testament. In the process, students will become more aware of their own interpretive methods. This will inculcate critical skills that can be applied to other texts throughout ministry and encourage life-long learning.

This module enables students to use the tools of modern scholarship, while paying attention to a text’s history of interpretation, and its relevance to contemporary ecclesial communities. The format of the module will include a combination of lectures, small-group learning and private study, which will encourage self-directed learning and reflection.

This module will explore several major areas of doctrine with a particular emphasis on their roots in Scripture and their expression in the work of significant recent and contemporary theologians from different Christian traditions.  Topics of discussion include approaches to systematic theology, Trinitarian theology, Christology, soteriology, sacramental theology, and ecclesiology.  Doctrines will be examined and interpreted with reference to their biblical foundations, selected primary theological texts (in translation where not originally in English) and, where relevant, other sources (e.g. art, liturgy, hymnody or material evidence) which have influenced their shape and reception.  Consideration will be given to each doctrine’s connection to the wider pattern of Christian theology.  Attention will be paid to the relationships between doctrine and contemporary Christian practice and experience.
This module will offer opportunities to explore a broad historical narrative of the Reformation era, with particular emphasis on England, and to consider the work of major theologians of the era, Catholic and Protestant, in their historical context.  Students will be asked to choose theological issues, research their historical context and investigate an aspect of theological response contemporary to the era.

Study will include an historical survey of the period and some of its central issues, accompanied by analysis of key theological texts.

For their written assessment students will be asked to discuss Luther’s Freedom of a Christian in relation to the Homily of Almsdeeds, Or to the Autobiography of a Hunted Priest  (John Gerard, S.J.) OR to Richard Greenham “Letter against Hardness of Heart” OR another document of their choice agreed with the module leader.

This module integrates the theory and practice of Christian ethics. It begins by looking at questions of methodology in Christian ethics, commending an approach to Christian ethics which engages with key sources: the Bible, Christian tradition, reason and experience. It considers different approaches which variously emphasise rules, consequences and virtues, before looking more closely at the key virtues of love and justice. Linked with this discussion are considerations of important issues in ecological, economic, political, medical and sexual ethics. Both academic understanding of Christian ethics and the practical living of Christian faith are emphasised.
This module enables students to gain an understanding of the principles and practices of learning and the skills required to apply them.  Students will be encouraged to reflect on the place of education in the mission and ministry of the church.  The module will introduce students to models of learning theory and practice, including relevant concepts such as learning styles, group dynamics, and faith development.  They will also develop skills needed to design, produce, implement and evaluate learning activities and resources. There will also be an exploration of the range of learning and  learning environments and contexts in which Christian education takes place and to which they could contribute in ministry.
This module enables students to gain an understanding of the principles and practices of learning for specific groups of learners relevant to the students context and ministry. I.e. children, families, young people and older learners. Students will be encouraged to reflect on models of learning theory and practice relevant to their target group and context, including the particular challenges and needs therein. They will also develop skills needed to design, produce, implement and evaluate learning activities and resources relevant to their target group.
This module will introduce students to biblical and theological understandings of leadership, authority, service and collaboration within the perspective of the church’s ministry and mission. Students will engage in a study of the relationship between spirituality and servant leadership and consider leadership from the perspective of listening to self, others God and the world. In the later part of the module students will have the opportunity to engage with theological and theoretical frameworks for management within a church context and offer transferable learning for management tasks within these contexts, including exploration of managing and building teams, managing meetings, decisions, others and themselves and aspects of change and conflict resolution.
This module is designed to enable participants to engage in independent learning related to a chosen subject area in the context of discipleship, mission and ministry. In consultation and negotiation with the tutor, participants will identify a topic, issue, or ministerial area relevant to the study of the theory and practice of ministry and in which there is academic expertise in the Cambridge Theological Federation. An independent learning project will be developed which may include both library and practical research. The area chosen may enhance and integrate study from the taught module programme providing the independent study is clearly distinguished from the content of such taught modules.
This module is designed to enable participants to engage in independent learning related to a chosen subject area in the context of discipleship, mission and ministry. In consultation and negotiation with the tutor, participants will identify a topic, issue, or ministerial area relevant to the study of the theory and practice of ministry and in which there is academic expertise in the Cambridge Theological Federation. An independent learning project will be developed which may include both library and practical research. The area chosen may enhance and integrate study from the taught module programme providing the independent study is clearly distinguished from the content of such taught modules.

Students enrolled on this module will be engaged in a sustained placement, place of work or other context which, together with prior experience, which provides the focus for reflection on areas of study which will include:

  • Deepening their knowledge and understanding of Christian worship in relation to its historical and ecclesial contexts, scriptural sources and contemporary application
  • The history, theology and contemporary practice of Christian spirituality.
  • The art of preaching including approaches to engaging with Scripture, doctrine and context; reflecting on the place of preaching in the church today; developing the practical skills of delivery and preparation.
  • Study of and responsible engagement with the theology, psychology and practice of pastoral care related to life’s milestones that is rooted in the life and worship of Christian community.
  • Study of children’s faith development, drawing on both psychological and theological perspectives, and how this can be nurtured in a range of contexts.

Students will focus on these subjects in relation to the traditions of the United Reformed Church.

This module is designed to help students to engage missionally with our contemporary culture. There are three elements to the module that contribute to this aim. First, it explores the evolving relationship between Christianity and its social and cultural context in the West, paying particular attention to the major intellectual, social and religious trends that have helped to shape people’s thinking in the 21st century as well as had a significant impact on the church’s life and witness. Second, the module aims to equip students with relevant contemporary skills for missional engagement. Underlying these is the ability to read and analyse culture from a missional perspective, exploring the unexamined assumptions of people around us whom the church is trying to reach. It aims to identify the key components for a church’s missional engagement, and to discern the key missional questions facing congregations today. The final element in the module is the study of apologetics. It surveys major apologetic approaches and evaluates their cultural effectiveness. It also tries to foster theological and cultural discernment in thinking about apologetic strategies, as well as nurture relevant skills in practice. As part of the course, students will present an apologetic approach to a contemporary question.
This module involves a partnership between a student’s training institution and a given placement, ministerial or work-based context which enables students to encounter, and work effectively within, such a setting. On-site staff and/or relevant staff in the students’ own training institution will provide supervision. Supervisors will report in writing on a student’s participation in the placement.

It builds on previous skills in understanding and analysing context and integrating theological enquiry with pastoral / ministerial /professional practice. It demands of students attentiveness to their own assumptions and biases. Placement, ministerial or work-based learning creates opportunity for deeper understanding of an unfamiliar setting in creative conversation with key themes from relevant disciplines, including biblical and doctrinal studies, missiology, sociology and anthropology (amongst many).

Students will be expected to agree a plan of activities with their placement supervisor, which takes into account specific learning outcomes agreed by their Director of Pastoral Studies/ Director of Practical Theology. Students will be expected to work with a journal of their experiences; research their context fully using available resources and apply methods of reading and/or profiling a context, provide verbatim and other accounts of pastoral encounters and ‘critical incidents’ for analysis in a group context and reflect with a placement supervisor on their own development. Group teaching on specific areas of contextual and pastoral ministry will be linked to independent reading and research as well as to the material students bring to the group for reflection.

This module involves a partnership between a student’s training institution and a given placement, ministerial or work-based context context which enables students to encounter, and work effectively within, such a setting and reflect creatively upon it. Supervision will be provided by a combination of on-site staff and relevant staff in the students’ own training institution.

It provides opportunity to enhance skills in understanding and analysing context, and integrating theological enquiry with pastoral / ministerial / professional practice. It draws upon the resources of Scripture and relevant Christian traditions in critical conversation with insights from other sources, including the social sciences. It demands of students attentiveness to their own assumptions and biases. Reflecting upon their placement, ministerial or work-based context, students will take responsibility for identifying key aspects, encounters and themes out of which to develop work for assessment.

This module is offered for students on the PC3 (context-based) pathway. It involves a partnership between the students’ training institution and a given context. The module comprises:

  • Regular guided practical experience of mission and ministry, normally with a team of other students, in the parish / congregation / pioneer initiative / mission project and the wider community throughout the year of study. This enables students to work effectively and collaboratively within a sustained setting that offers both ecclesial and non-ecclesial ministerial and mission experience.
  • An introduction to theological reflection methodologies and to methods for analysing and reading a context. Both personal and collaborative theological reflection is practiced.
  • Contextual engagement with key themes of relevant disciplines, with a particular focus on opportunities to develop understanding and practice of spirituality and worship.
  • Supervision by on-site staff (usually the church / project leader) and a tutor in the students’ own training institution.

This module aims to introduce students to some of the major figures and themes in Christian spirituality. The module intends to create awareness of the plurality of expression in Christian spirituality and to consider how contextual issues and expressions are held in positive tension with the common life of the Christian Church.

The module will consider the historic context of the different topics it addresses but will also attempt to consider the impact of contemporary issues on the way in which a particular tradition is interpreted today. The module will address the challenges and opportunities that a modern, secular context presents to the way Christians live out the faith today, the ways in which the relationship between the various Christian traditions to the wider society has evolved, and the ways in which a meaningful, reciprocal dialogue can exist between contemporary society and Christian spirituality.

Students will be encouraged to reflect on the ways in which their current and future ministry may be shaped by the encounter with these traditions. Equally, students will be encouraged to explore the ways in which an awareness and appropriation of past expressions in Christian spirituality can lead to new and fresh Christian experiences. In this context, students will be asked to consider issues of continuity, adaptation, and fresh expressions in Christian spirituality.

This module requires the student to undertake a term of study at an institution which has been approved by the Common Awards Management Board for this purpose (including approval of a conversion scheme for marks from that institution to grades for the student’s Durham award). The Management Board will also need to have approved the TEI’s processes for ensuring that:
• the particular programme the student will undertake, in conjunction with their study at their TEI, will enable them to fulfil and demonstrate fulfilment of the level 5 learning outcomes for the DipHE or BA in Theology, Ministry and Mission
• the student will be appropriately supported before and during their time away
• the student is not inappropriately charged full fees by their TEI if they are also paying a fee to the overseas institution
• the student will engage in modules as provided by and agreed with the host institution. These modules will also be subject to the agreement of the sending TEI, and where necessary the student’s sponsoring church.
The aim of this module is to explore in depth the close critical reading and intensive study of a particular text from the Old Testament.  In the process, students will examine the range of interpretative approaches available, and the different ways in which these texts can be interpreted responsibly in a variety of different contexts. This will develop critical skills that can be applied to other texts throughout ministry and encourage life-long learning.

This module enables students to use the tools of modern scholarship, while paying attention to a text’s history of interpretation, and its relevance to contemporary ecclesial communities. The format of the module will include a combination of lectures, small-group learning and private study, which will encourage self-directed learning and reflection.

This module will offer an in-depth exploration of one area of Christian doctrine: Political Theology. The following definition of political theology forms the approach taken in this module: ‘Theology is broadly understood as discourse about God, and human persons as they relate to God. The political is broadly understood as the use of structural power to organize a society or community of people . . . Political theology is, then, the analysis and criticism of political arrangements . . . from the perspective of differing interpretations of God’s way with the world’ (Cavanaugh and Scott, 2007, p. 2).  Students will be introduced to major sources, traditions, approaches, and themes in both historical and contemporary Christian political theologies.  The course will begin by introducing an overview of the major schools and thinkers within the discipline.  It will subsequently navigate by introducing a series of key historical perspectives on the nature of government (such as Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Anabaptist theology) which still shape modern and contemporary responses to particular issues (such as religious violence and human rights).  Interwoven throughout the course will be the emerging voices from twentieth and twenty-first century political theology.  This structure will allow historical and contemporary political theologians to be introduced descriptively as thinkers and political agents in specific times and contexts as well as addressing them normatively, as the voices within (even if at the margins of) the Christian tradition which serve as sources for students as they shape political theologies in their own time and context.
This module surveys diverse approaches in modern theology, paying attention to their contexts, methods, and legacies. The module explores how Christian thought developed in response to various aspects of modernity and postmodernity. The module encourages study of major modern theological texts and debate of their method, implications, and impact. Through engaging with the concept of theological methodology and methods, and how they lead to divergent theological positions, this module encourages students to identify and evaluate these methods and to develop their own theological judgements and commitments. Students will build on relevant secondary literature and guided primary reading in order to identify, compare, and evaluate major modern theological trends and their contexts.
This module integrates the theory and practice of Christian ethics. It begins by looking at questions of methodology in Christian ethics, commending an approach to Christian ethics which engages with key sources: the Bible, Christian tradition, reason and experience. It considers different approaches which variously emphasise rules, consequences and virtues, before looking more closely at the key virtues of love and justice. Linked with this discussion are considerations of important issues in political, ecological, economic, medical and sexual ethics. Both academic understanding of Christian ethics and the practical living of Christian faith are emphasised.
This module will introduce students to biblical and theological understandings of leadership, authority, service and collaboration within the perspective of the church’s ministry and mission. Students will engage in a study of the relationship between spirituality and servant leadership and consider leadership from the perspective of listening to self, others God and the world. In the later part of the module students will have the opportunity to engage with theological and theoretical frameworks for management within a church context and offer transferable learning for management tasks within these contexts, including exploration of managing and building teams, managing meetings, decisions, others and themselves and aspects of change and conflict resolution.
This module will enable students to explore the education of adults for Christian discipleship. It will help students to evaluate different adult education theories and to consider how these relate to the theory and practice of Christian discipleship and adult education in ministerial contexts. Students will reflect on relevant theologies which will underpin and energise their understandings of Christian education and mission, and will have the opportunity to reflect theologically on their own role and identity as a Christian educator and life-long learner. The module will engage with different ecclesial contexts and perspectives and consider texts produced by Christian churches to guide the work of Christian education.

There will be opportunities for students to develop their own skills in adult education and discipleship: planning, structuring and evaluating sessions; preparing handouts; facilitating a group discussion; integrating various media, and drawing sessions together in prayer.

This module is designed to enable participants to engage in independent learning related to a chosen subject area in the context of discipleship, mission and ministry. In consultation and negotiation with the tutor, participants will identify a topic, issue, or ministerial area relevant to the study of the theory and practice of ministry and in which there is academic expertise in the Cambridge Theological Federation. An independent learning project will be developed which may include both library and practical research. The area chosen may enhance and integrate study from the taught module programme providing the independent study is clearly distinguished from the content of such taught modules.
This module is designed to enable participants to engage in independent learning related to a chosen subject area in the context of discipleship, mission and ministry. In consultation and negotiation with the tutor, participants will identify a topic, issue, or ministerial area relevant to the study of the theory and practice of ministry and in which there is academic expertise in the Cambridge Theological Federation. An independent learning project will be developed which may include both library and practical research. The area chosen may enhance and integrate study from the taught module programme providing the independent study is clearly distinguished from the content of such taught modules.
A dissertation provides an opportunity to develop research skills and inquiry-based learning and to lay the foundations for possible future work at a higher degree level. Participants will, in consultation and negotiation with the tutor, identify a topic, issue, or ministerial area relevant to the study of theology, ministry and mission. The proposed title of the dissertation, together with a brief description and initial bibliography, must be submitted for approval by the Examination Board.

The student is responsible for arranging supervisions and organising a timetable and plan for his/her work. An introductory meeting with the year group will introduce the dissertation and explain the process for approving the proposed topic. The area chosen may enhance and integrate study from the taught module programme provided that the independent study is clearly distinguished from the content of such taught modules

This module will examine the history and principles of the United Reformed Church. While rooted in the theology and ecclesiology which arose from the Protestant Reformation and found its home in what became the Reformed Tradition, attention will also be given to the importance of Dissent and Nonconformity and how they shaped the contemporary life of the URC. The main questions pursued in the module are (1) What does history tell us about how and why the URC came to be as it now is? And (2) Does the tradition inherited from those who have gone before enable the URC to respond to the call to be the Church in the twenty-first century? The module explores how the URC is called to live, organise itself and engage with the world, and to do so in such a way that builds up the life of the Church and gives glory to God.
This module is designed to help students to engage missionally with our contemporary culture. There are three elements to the module that contribute to this aim. First, it explores the evolving relationship between Christianity and its social and cultural context in the West, paying particular attention to the major intellectual, social and religious trends that have helped to shape people’s thinking in the 21st century as well as had a significant impact on the church’s life and witness. Second, the module aims to equip students with relevant contemporary skills for missional engagement. Underlying these is the ability to read and analyse culture from a missional perspective, exploring the unexamined assumptions of people around us whom the church is trying to reach. It aims to identify the key components for a church’s missional engagement, and to discern the key missional questions facing congregations today. The final element in the module is the study of apologetics. It surveys major apologetic approaches and evaluates their cultural effectiveness. It also tries to foster theological and cultural discernment in thinking about apologetic strategies, as well as nurture relevant skills in practice. As part of the course, students will present an apologetic approach to a contemporary question.
This module involves a partnership between a student’s training institution and a ministerial context which enables students to encounter, and work effectively within, a specific ministerial setting. On-site staff will provide day-to-day supervision with tutors in the students learning organisation facilitating reflection and deep learning.

The module provides an opportunity for students to critically dialogue with their pastoral, ministerial and missional practice, in light of existing, developing and new knowledge at an intermediate level.  The process demands of the students an attentiveness to their own assumptions and biases as they develop an integrated approach to ministry and mission within their specialism. Ministerial-based learning creates opportunity for deeper understanding of familiar settings in creative conversation with key themes from relevant disciplines, including: biblical, ecclesiastical and doctrinal studies, missiology, education and the social sciences (amongst others).

This module aims to introduce students to some of the major figures and themes in Christian spirituality. The module intends to create awareness of the plurality of expression in Christian spirituality and to consider how contextual issues and expressions are held in positive tension with the common life of the Christian Church.

The module will consider the historic context of the different topics it addresses but will also attempt to consider the impact of contemporary issues on the way in which a particular tradition is interpreted today. The module will address the challenges and opportunities that a modern, secular context presents to the way Christians live out the faith today, the ways in which the relationship between the various Christian traditions to the wider society has evolved, and the ways in which a meaningful, reciprocal dialogue can exist between contemporary society and Christian spirituality.

Students will be encouraged to reflect on the ways in which their current and future ministry may be shaped by the encounter with these traditions. Equally, students will be encouraged to explore the ways in which an awareness and appropriation of past expressions in Christian spirituality can lead to new and fresh Christian experiences. In this context, students will be asked to consider issues of continuity, adaptation, and fresh expressions in Christian spirituality.

This module aims to support students in the variety of relationship with others which forms the heart of ministry. In particular the module encourages and facilitates considered self-reflection in order to develop the robust emotional intelligence that ministry demands.  Within this there will be a focus on a healthy acceptance of power within all relationships, the nature of assertiveness within conflict and non-conflict situations, and the importance of self-care in sustainable long-term engagement.  These considerations will draw on a number of disciplines while students are encouraged to locate them all in a theological worldview that is able to live in the tension between and within hope, faith and love.
The aim of this module is to facilitate student’s development as an advanced children and families minister.  The module encourages students to synthesise and integrate their learning within a considered approach to ministry that can be articulated to both fellow professionals and non-specialists.  The module facilitates student’s self-understanding as a children and family minister and prepares them for engagement in future ministry where they will be expected to communicate a vision for the work to multiple audiences.
The aim of this module is to facilitate student’s development as an advanced youth minister.  The module encourages students to synthesise and integrate their learning within a considered approach to ministry that can be articulated to both fellow professionals and non-specialists.  The module facilitates student’s self-understanding as a youth minister and prepares them for engagement in future ministry where they will be expected to communicate a vision for the work to multiple audiences.
This module requires the student to undertake a term of study at an institution which has been approved by the Common Awards Management Board for this purpose (including approval of a conversion scheme for marks from that institution to grades for the student’s Durham award). The Management Board will also need to have approved the TEI’s processes for ensuring that:

  • the particular programme the student will undertake, in conjunction with their study at their TEI, will enable them to fulfil and demonstrate fulfilment of the level 6 learning outcomes for the BA or Graduate Diploma in Theology, Ministry and Mission
  • the student will be appropriately supported before and during their time away
  • the student is not inappropriately charged full fees by their TEI if they are also paying a fee to the overseas institution
  • the student will engage in modules as provided by and agreed with the host institution. These modules will also be subject to the agreement of the sending TEI, and where necessary the student’s sponsoring church.
Qualification Comparisons:

Level 6: Bachelor’s Degree/Bachelor Degree with Honours, PGCE, Graduate Diplomas, Graduate Certificates

Level 5: Foundation Degrees, Diplomas of Higher Education, Higher National Diplomas, NVQ Level 4, Vocational Qualification Level 5

Level 4: Higher National Certificates, certificates of Higher Education, Vocational Qualifications Level 4